Argentine Tango Changes Of Direction

Cross, ocho and change of direction – if you associate it with Gordian knot you might be right!

Last updated 2022-01-10 | 0

- Changes of direction through typical change through ochos forward or back
- Changes of direction through alterations
- Changes of direction through cortes

What you'll learn

Changes of direction through typical change through ochos forward or back
Changes of direction through alterations
Changes of direction through cortes

* Requirements

* You need to know how to dance tango at at least intermediate level (giros and ochos) to undesratdn and apply the explanations.

Description

When you truly understand something - applying is a matter of practice.

When you finally get to learn the ochos in Argentine tango it seems like a huge victory. You get to understand that they are happening (as one of the versions) in a cross-system.

You learn that there is a cross position an open position and it all relates to where the partner is placed. You also get to know that ochos are more mostly executed by the follower and led by the leader, although the other version around is possible too.

You get to know that when the follower is executing crosses forward it’s called ocho forward or front ocho. And when the follower is going back - it's called back ocho, or backward ocho. You are able to enter an exit from the ochos and that becomes your go-to figure. Now you really know how to dance the Argentine tango and then… this happens…

Learn the difference between the change of direction and its modifications, such as alterations or cortes. Add them to your repertoire and apply immediately through the proposed Short Sequence.

All ochos are crosses, but NOT all crosses are ochos

Then your teacher surprises you with this statement: ‘all ochos are crosses but not all crosses are ochos’. What's going on in here?!?

‘Ocho’ translates into ‘eight’ so the figure shall somehow resemble the eight-shape. In fact, it looks more like an Infinity sign. Thus, if you analyze the ocho by simply drawing it on the paper, it requires two directions. Since one step goes towards one direction, we need another step going the opposite direction, to complete the 8-shape.

Therefore, to execute one ocho, one requires 2 steps going in the opposite directions. In order to achieve the effect of crossing in the middle (just like figure 8 does) – the two steps need to be crosses (forward crosses or back crosses).

It does not really matter if the ocho goes forward or backward. The rule still applies - to make one ocho we need two forward crosses or two back-crosses.

Of course, as a mental shortcut, we often say ocho, ocho, ocho, ocho - meaning forward cross, forward cross, forward cross, forward cross, It's all fine as long as you know what you are referring to.

Analyzing the ochos from the perspective of two steps going in the opposite direction, and relationship to the partner, we can observe another interesting aspect. In reference to the partner, one of the crosses travels to the left and the second cross travels to the right. if we continue with our ochos, we’ll continue doing one of the steps traveling to the left in the relationship to the partner, and one step traveling to the right in the relationship to the partner.

Who this course is for:

  • Tango dancers at intermediate and higher levels
  • Dancers from other genres who are comfortable in converting what they already know
  • Those who can mimic anything

Course content

4 sections • 8 lectures

Changes of Direction - lesson 1 Preview 54:58

Quick review-Changes of Direction - lesson 1 Preview 03:54

Changes of Direction - lesson 2 Preview 45:38

Quick review-Changes of Direction - lesson 2 Preview 03:19

Changes of Direction - lesson 3 Preview 51:18

Quick review-Changes of Direction - lesson 3 Preview 01:17

Changes of Direction - lesson 4 Preview 01:11:31

Quick review-Changes of Direction - lesson 4 Preview 02:22